2016 Trauma and Dissociation Conference Flier

Trauma Informed Care

2016 Trauma and Dissociation Conference

 

Friday, October 7th -Sunday, October 9th, 2016

 

This Year’s Theme:

 

“Perspectives on Trauma-Informed Care”

 

Conference Introduction:

Don’t miss this three-day fundraising event hosted by Ivory Garden Nonprofit Corporation for the purpose of bringing awareness and education of how trauma affects people.  Being ‘trauma-informed’ is the foundation for practicing trauma-informed care.   By learning from internationally renowned clinicians, researchers, authors, and lecturers in the field of trauma-related disorders, you will leave this conference with the information needed to better understand and relate to survivors within your profession or daily life.  Learn from survivors who will also be presenting workshops, memoirs, and personal experiences.  We look forward to seeing everyone in Seattle: October 7th-9th, 2016 for another amazing event.  A big welcome to teachers, nurses, clinicians, other professionals, survivors and supporters.

Conference Goals and Objectives:

1. Describe the components of trauma-informed care, and how they differ from standard care.

2. Describe the basic physiology of the trauma response in mammals.

3. Describe the concept of complex PTSD and the symptoms it includes.

4. Describe the role of trauma in psychosis and depression.

5. Describe the core features of a teaching program for trauma-informed care.

17 CEU’s with certificates available to Licensed Social Workers, Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists and Licensed Mental Health Counselors (Provider number#1975-362) through NASW.

When:

The conference will begin on Friday, October 7th, 2016 and end October 9th, 2106 at 5:30 p.m.

 

Who is Coming:

Survivors of trauma, supporters including family, friends, professionals are welcome and will benefit from the material presented.  There will be seminars, educational workshops, and interactive activities available for all to attend.  There will also be evening entertainment.  Please see the schedules as we update them.

Where:

The Radisson Hotel Seattle Airport will be the site of this year’s conference.

Keep updated on this site for upcoming travel and rental car discounts.

ADDRESS:

18118 International Blvd, Seattle, WA
 
+1 (800) 333-3333 ( US/Canada Toll-free )
+1 (206) 244-6666
 
Please visit their website for amenities and particulars.  This hotel is beautiful, comfortable, and accommodating.   Radisson Hotel, Seattle.
 
We have held a block of rooms at the price of $119.00 per night (for single, double, and ADA rooms) from October 6th-10th, and the hotel will honor the price 3 days before and three days after those dates.  If you are even considering attending, you should call the hotel and let them know that you are with the “Seattle Trauma Conference” group and book rooms – as many as you think you ‘may’ need.  You may book rooms now and if you need to, cancel them without penalty up to 24 hours before – check on that with the hotel.  This hotel has a total of about 200 rooms and book about 90% capacity everyday.   This is very important to you as our guests.  We are excited that we were able to provide for attendees such a warm and friendly venue – but we would also like to see everyone together at the hotel.  Our group is not limited to rooms, but the hotel will most likely ‘run out of rooms’ if you don’t book yours’ soon.  It would be fun to be all together at the hotel that weekend.  There is also free parking, and it is a ‘pet-friendly’ hotel.   If you feel better with your pet there, and they are trained in public, bring them.  Please call the hotel and visit their site for more information.

Guest Speakers, Topics, and Scheduled Times:

2016 Conference Speakers
Click on speaker tab for information.

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COLIN A. ROSS, M.D.

COLIN A. ROSS, M.D.

Dr. Ross is an Internationally Renowned Clinician, Researcher, Author, and Lecturer in the field of trauma-related disorders.

Colin A. Ross received his M.D. from the University of Alberta in 1981 and completed his psychiatry training at the University of Manitoba in 1985. He has been running a Trauma Program in the Dallas, Texas area since 1991 and consults to two other Trauma Programs, one at Forest View Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan and one at Del Amo Hospital in Torrance, California. His Texas Trauma Program moved to UBH Denton in September, 2015. Dr. Ross is the author of 28 books and 200 professional papers and is a Past President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. Dr. Ross has spoken widely throughout North America and in Europe, China, Malaysia, Australia and New Zealand. Besides his psychiatric research and writing, Dr. Ross has written poetry, short stories, essays, aphorisms, creative non-fiction, and screenplays.   Colin A. Ross Institute for Psychological Trauma Website

Presentations:

San Juan Ballroom –

Saturday,  All day

9:15-10:30 p.m. – Plenary – “A Dissociative Structural Model of Mental Disorders and Addictions” 1 CEU

In this session, Dr. Ross will explain a dissociative structural model of psychological trauma.  The model unifies a wide range of comorbid symptoms into a single process that requires a single, integrated treatment plan.  Diagnoses unified within the model include PTSD, dissociative disorders, borderline personality disorder, somatization disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, impulse control disorder and some forms of schizophrenia.

Upon completion of this session, attendees will be able to:

  1.     Explain the basic logic of the dissociative structural model of mental disorders
  2.     Describe how the model accounts for a wide range of comorbid symptoms common in trauma survivors
  3.     Explore the differences between treatment within this model and conventional treatment plans

10:45-11:45 a.m. – “How Common is DID and Can It Be Reliably Diagnosed?” 1 CEU

In this talk, Dr. Ross will review research answering two questions: how common is DID; and can it be reliably diagnosed? DID affects about 1% of the general population and 4% of general adult psychiatric inpatients and it can be diagnosed with good reliability. Using the standard statistic for reliability, Cohen’s kappa, DID has a reliability above 0.70 while, in the DSM-5 field trials, depression has a reliability of 0.28 and schizophrenia 0.42.

  1. To describe research on the epidemiology of DID in a variety of populations and countries
  2. To describe data on the reliability of DID as a diagnosis, and to compare it to the reliability of other DSM-5 disorders.
  3. To describe the theoretical, political and clinical implications of these data.

1:00-3:00 p.m. – “Trauma Model Therapy: The Problem of Attachment to the Perpetrator and the Locus of Control Shift” 2 CEU’s

The problem of attachment to the perpetrator is one of the core elements of Dr. Ross’ Trauma Model Therapy. When a small child is abused by his or her primary caretakers, he or she is dependent for survival on the people who harm her. This causes a painful, conflicted, ambivalent attachment pattern. The pattern often persists into adulthood. One of the primary tasks of recovery is to heal the disrupted attachment patterns, and form stable secure attachments between parts of the self and between the self and other people.

Objectives:

  1. To describe the problem of attachment to the perpetrator and its role in Trauma Model Therapy.
  2. To describe the relationship between childhood trauma, disrupted attachment, grief and dissociation.
  3. To describe how so-called “disorganized attachment” is the inevitable outcome of being abused by one’s primary caretakers.
  4. To describe treatment strategies for resolving the problem of attachment to the perpetrator.

3:15-5:15 p.m. – Colin Ross, M.D. & Dana C. Ross M.D., MSC, FRCPC  Present:  “Open Discussion, Questions and Answers.” 2 CEU’s

In this session Dr. Colin Ross and Dr. Dana Ross will provide an open forum for attendees to ask questions and engage in discussion around trauma-related topics. Clarification of any points that were not made clear by the presenters in their previous talks may be addressed. This is also an opportunity for attendees to ask questions related to their own clinical work. This will be an interactive workshop.

1. To provide a forum for open questions and discussion.

  1. To provide attendees an opportunity for brief case consultations.
  2. To clarify any points not made clear in previous talks by the presenters.

DANA C. ROSS, M.D.

DANA C. ROSS, MD, MSc, FRCPC

Dr. Ross is on staff at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, where she specializes in trauma, PTSD and dissociation.

Dr. Ross received her M.D. and a Master’s Degree in neuroscience from the University of Calgary and completed her psychiatry training at the University of Toronto in 2015. She is on staff at Women’s College Hospital in Toronto, where she specializes in trauma, PTSD and dissociation.

Presentations:

San Juan Ballroom

Friday, 9:15-10:30 a.m.

Plenary:

“Unpacking the Concept of  “Trauma-informed Care'” 1 CEU

Trauma-informed care is an essential concept for health care providers to understand and implement in order to nurture rather than retraumatize clients. In this session, Dr. Ross will outline the guiding principles that drive the concept of trauma-informed care. Strategies that promote an environment based on delivering TIC will be reviewed and examples from an individual to a systems level will be examined. 

Participants will be able to:

  1. Define the guiding principles for understanding and providing trauma-informed care
  2. Describe specific strategies for working with clients who have a history of psychological trauma
  3. Discuss the potential challenges and rewards of implementing TIC practices

3:15-5:15 p.m.

“An Introduction to the Neurobiology of Developmental Trauma” 2 CEU’s

In this talk, Dr. Ross will review how trauma impacts the brain with a look at relevant neuroanatomy and key pathways in the brain. Trauma has a significant impact on cognition including memory, attention and executive function and it is important to be familiar with these domains when assessing symptoms and during recovery. The autonomic nervous system plays a key role in maintaining symptoms in PTSD and it is important to understand this system in planning treatment approaches.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the impact of trauma on the brain
  2. List 3 cognitive domains that are negatively impacted by trauma
  3. Understand the neurobiology behind specific treatment interventions

Saturday,  3:15-5:15 p.m.

Dana C. Ross M.D., MSC, FRCPC and Colin Ross, M.D.  Present:  “Open Discussion, Questions and Answers.”

In this session Dr. Colin Ross and Dr. Dana Ross will provide an open forum for attendees to ask questions and engage in discussion around trauma-related topics. Clarification of any points that were not made clear by the presenters in their previous talks may be addressed. This is also an opportunity for attendees to ask questions related to their own clinical work. This will be an interactive workshop.

1. To provide a forum for open questions and discussion.

  1. To provide attendees an opportunity for brief case consultations.
  2. To clarify any points not made clear in previous talks by the presenters.

A. STEVEN FRANKEL, PH.D., J.D.

A. STEVEN FRANKEL, PH.D., J.D.

Steve Frankel is Board Certified Clinical and Forensic Psychologist and an Attorney at Law, who practices both professions in San Francisco’s East Bay.

Steve Frankel is Board Certified Clinical and Forensic Psychologist and an Attorney at Law, who practices both professions in San Francisco’s East Bay. A past Director of Clinical Training and current Clinical Prof. of Psychology at USC, he began recognizing childhood trauma in his adult patient case-load in 1980 and has specialized in working with that population ever since. He joined the Int’l. Society for the Study of Trauma & Dissociation in the 1990s and was the consultant to the Trauma Program at Del Amo Hospital from 1993 until 2001. He was President of the ISSTD in 2002 and has been active in developing and teaching courses in trauma treatment as well as publishing chapters in books and professional journals in the trauma field.

Presentations:

San Juan Ballroom

Friday, 10:45-11:45 a.m.

“What would have happened if Dr. Jekyll were tried for Mr. Hyde’s crimes?  D.I.D. and the law.” 1 CEU

Description:  Jekyll on Trial is a book that represents a landmark on the topic of Dissociative Identity and the law, as it reviews, jurisdiction-by-jurisdiction, the ways in which laws understand and treat D.I.D., with some jurisdictions applying a “not guilty by reason of insanity” model, others denying such a model for D.I.D.s who commit crimes, and still others taking any of a broad variety of positions. Recent cases will be described as movements toward increasing fairness.

Objectives:

  1. At least two different models applied by U.S. courts for crimes committed by people with D.I.D.
  2. At least two ways to approach juries when testifying as court experts on cases for which D.I.D. is relevant
  3. Two issues of critical importance regarding the role of the defense attorney in criminal cases for which D.I.D. is involved.

1:00-3:00 p.m.

“Client & Therapist, Working to Work Together – Is it Oil & Water or Milk & Honey?”  (Co-presented with Joan Golston, DCSW, LICSW) 2 CEU’S – Ethics

Description: The success of therapy depends on the effective collaboration of client and therapist – but that’s almost always easier said than done. Life has taught the dissociative survivor lessons that run counter to what therapy calls for, and the therapist’s expectations, training and sense of self can also get in the way.  Two seasoned therapists, consultants and teachers will point to some common issues and struggles in the early stages of therapy, issues that sometimes continue on long beyond the start, and that can distort, confuse and even torpedo the work. The presenters will also sketch out remedies designed to help client and therapist smooth the path, and form a powerful alliance, all while still being themselves.

Objectives:
1) Attendees will be able to name at least three aspects of the dissociative client’s experience, stance and symptoms that can interfere with, complicate or defeat the formation of an effective alliance with their therapist.

2) Attendees will be able to name at least three aspects of the therapist’s experience, stance and agenda that can interfere with, complicate or defeat the formation of an effective alliance.

3) Attendees will be able to name three ways client and therapist can together address problems and enhance the effort to form an effective alliance and therapy.

Plenary: Sunday 9:30 – 10:30 a.m.

“Understanding and appreciating D.I.D.: Up from the ghetto” 1 CEU

Description:

This 1-hour presentation begins with a review of what has become known as “the Ghetto Model” of Dissociative Identity Disorder. The Ghetto model represents a historic view of what forces develop when people are persecuted, in groups and individually, how those forces operate to serve needs for survival, and how the “cultures” resulting from abuse and oppression may transform, following a pathway that, in many ways, can be seen in the structure and function of the United Nations.

Goals/Objectives: Attendees will learn:

  1. How accurately the ghetto metaphor describes cultures of oppression
  2. How the ghetto structure balances needs for survival and safety
  3. How the United Nations metaphor represents a pathway toward healing


LAURA S. BROWN, PH.D

Laura Brown, PH.D

Laura S. Brown is a clinical and forensic psychologist in independent practice in Seattle, Washington.

Laura S. Brown is a clinical and forensic psychologist in independent practice in Seattle, Washington. A writer and speaker on feminist therapy theory and practice, she offers workshops and trainings to professionals and the public on such topics as trauma treatment, cultural competence, psychological assessment, and ethics. She is the author of Your Turn for Care: Surviving the aging and death of the adults who harmed you, and the forthcoming book Not the Price of Admission: Healthy relationships after childhood trauma, in addition to 10 volumes for professionals.

Presentation:

Lopez Room

Friday, 3:15-4:15 p.m.

“Not the price of admission: Healthy relationships after childhood trauma.” 1 CEU

 “I wrote this book because of my experience that many people who were abused, neglected, or otherwise given less-than-adequate experiences of attachment, love, and connection struggle in very predictable ways in their adult friendships, work relationships, and romantic relationships. Many survivors believe, consciously or otherwise, that they must pay a price to have anyone relate to them. Some of those prices are psychological–safety, self-respect, boundaries. Others are more direct, as when a survivor bears too much financial responsibility for an able-bodied adult partner. Adult survivors know that being exploited, used, and sometimes abused in their connections with others feels like normal life, even if they have come to know that it’s wrong.  Not the price examines how these core beliefs were set in place, and then explores the ways in which survivors can learn how to stop paying prices. It’s my hope that it will shed light for survivors on what have felt like, but need not be, painful or futile efforts to have good-enough love and connection in their adult lives.”  http://www.drlaurabrown.com/written/not-the-price-of-admission-healthy-relationships-after-childhood-trauma/

Presentation description: This workshop will describe and discuss common challenges faced by survivors attempting to have emotionally meaningful relationships. We’ll consider ways in which childhood trauma affects attachment dynamics, and look at strategies for having healthy connections in adulthood.

Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to identify three patterns of problematic attachment
2. Participants will be able to apply the constructs of radical present-time behavior and mindfulness to relationships.
3. Participants will be able to define and describe the Emotional Part of Personality (EP) and its contributions to relationship challenges for survivors complex childhood trauma.


JOAN C. GOLSTON, DCSW, LICSW

JOAN C. GOLSTON, DCSW, LICSW

Joan C. Golston, DCSW, LICSW, is a therapist, supervisor and clinical and forensic consultant in private practice in Seattle, Washington.

Joan C. Golston, DCSW, LICSW, is a therapist, supervisor and clinical and forensic consultant in private practice in Seattle, Washington. She has been Chair of the NASW Washington Chapter Ethics Committee for some 15 years, was honored as the Chapter’s 2006 Social Worker of the Year, and is a Fellow and Director of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation (ISST-D). She is a co-author of the recently published Guidelines for Treating Dissociative Identity Disorder in Adults, 3rd revision. Joan teaches ISST-D international courses on the psychotherapy of the dissociative disorders, and has served as a consultant in a number of legal cases regarding ethics and professional standards. In November, she will present a pre-conference institute on “Ethics in the Treatment of Trauma” in Montreal. Joan is a warm and engaging speaker who has presented over a hundred professional lectures and workshops, and earned a reputation as a teacher who makes complex topics easily comprehensible and even entertaining.

Presentations:

San Juan Ballroom

Friday, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

“Client & Therapist, Working to Work Together – Is it Oil & Water or Milk & Honey?”  (Co-presented with A. STEVEN FRANKEL, PH.D., J.D.) 2 CEU’s Ethics

The success of therapy depends on the effective collaboration of client and therapist – but that’s almost always easier said than done. Life has taught the dissociative survivor lessons that run counter to what therapy calls for, and the therapist’s expectations, training and sense of self can also get in the way.  Two seasoned therapists, consultants and teachers will point to some common issues and struggles in the early stages of therapy, issues that sometimes continue on long beyond the start, and that can distort, confuse and even torpedo the work. The presenters will also sketch out remedies designed to help client and therapist smooth the path, and form a powerful alliance, all while still being themselves.

Objectives:
1) Attendees will be able to name at least three aspects of the dissociative client’s experience, stance and symptoms that can interfere with, complicate or defeat the formation of an effective alliance with their therapist.

2) Attendees will be able to name at least three aspects of the therapist’s experience, stance and agenda that can interfere with, complicate or defeat the formation of an effective alliance.

3) Attendees will be able to name three ways client and therapist can together address problems and enhance the effort to form an effective alliance and therapy.

Lopez Room

Friday,4:15-5:15 p.m.

Title: “Lessons from the Testimony of a Concentration Camp Survivor – a powerful primer on the effect devastating abuse has on the dissociative child or adult emerging from other contexts of suffering and neglect.”

Using extensive excerpts from the written testimony of a concentration camp survivor, we’ll highlight experiences, coping strategies, and difficult symptoms abused children and adult survivors have in common with many concentration camp inmates. There’s value in hearing another account of the universal human reaction to the fight for survival in harsh and inhumane conditions.

Please note:  Out of respect for this brave woman’s gift and legacy, no one will be admitted after the start of this presentation, although attendees are of course welcome to leave when they’d like. 

Objectives:

1) Participants will be able to describe one way abusers have influence even when they are absent.

2) Participants will be able to describe an example of shame interfering with needed human connection.

3) Participants will be able to describe an example of ordinary life values giving way to the demands of survival.

 

DAVID L. CALOF, DAPA

DAVID L. CALOF

David L. Calof has practiced psychotherapy, family therapy and hypnotherapy in his native Seattle for 40 years.

David L. Calof, DAPA has practiced psychotherapy, family therapy and hypnotherapy in his native Seattle for 40 years. A highly regarded clinician, Mr. Calof has lectured and consulted frequently at educational institutions, professional associations, hospitals, mental health centers, and social service agencies across the United States, and in Canada, England, France, Germany, Australia, and Japan on the treatment of posttraumatic and post-abuse syndromes, (with special regard to the dissociative disorders), self-injury syndromes, hypnotherapy, couples and family therapy. Mr. Calof has authored two books and over 50 professional publications on hypnotherapy, marriage and family therapy, and the treatment of psychological trauma and child abuse. His last book, The Couple Who Became Each Other and Other Tales of Healing From a Leading Hypnotherapist (with Robin Simons, BantamDoubledayDell, 1996) (a featured alternate selection for the Behavioral Science Book Service in 1997), has been published in North American, United Kingdom, French, German, and Israeli editions and garnered highly favorable reviews (1, 2) internationally. http://www.clinicalworkshops.com/about/about_david_calof/

Presentation:

San Juan Ballroom:

Sunday, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

Topic: “Exploring Motivation, Meaning and Intervention in Self-Injuring Behavior and Suicidal Ideation with David L. Calof – 2 CEU’s

Description:  

This educational presentation, suitable for all attendees, will feature a brief overview by the presenter, but will respond the specific needs of the participants through an extensive question and discussion session.

Objectives:

Through lecture, discussion, Q+A, handouts, and case consultation:

  1. Participants will be able to identify and discuss at least four common methods of self-injury in post-trauma-related disorders and distinguish them from frankly suicidal methods.
  1. Participants will be able to identify and discuss at least four functional motivations for frank suicidality in post-trauma-related disorders.
  1. Participants will be able to identify and discuss common functional motivations for self-injurious behavior in post-trauma populations.
  1. Participants will be able to discuss a case-based clinical intervention framework that is oriented toward addressing motivational dynamics, not merely self-harming behavior alone. 

LYNN CROOK, M.Ed.

LYNN CROOK, M.Ed.Lynn Crook was a therapist when she recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse. Since her successful lawsuit, she’s been investigating false memory claims. She presented her findings in the U.S., England, and at the United Nations. She joined a comedy improv group to handle any hecklers that might show up. They didn’t. Lynn is an editor emeritus of Treating Abuse Today, and is writing a book she’s currently calling “An Inconvenient Crime.”

Presentations:

Orcas Room

Friday,  10:45-11:45 a.m.

“Backstage at the false memory campaign” 1 CEU

Description:

This presentation will investigate a campaign designed to portray child sex abuse allegations as false memories.  By 1991, a dozen states permitted lawsuits based on repressed/recovered memories of sexual abuse.  Thousands of accused child molesters were facing potential lawsuits when a carefully-orchestrated PR campaign kicked off in 1992.  The Associated Press promptly announced, “Repressed memories of sexual abuse may be false and can be inadvertently suggested by therapists.”  Adults accused of molesting children donated over $7,000,000 to promote the false memory campaign.  Critics of false memory claims were threatened, sued and picketed.      Behind the scenes, another story was quietly taking place.  As research supporting corroboration for recovered memories expanded, a study supporting false memories was coming dangerously close to failure.  When the rescued study was published in 1995, the text inexplicably reported three different results. And while early lawsuits against therapists ended in quick settlements, later cases would be called into question by experts and attorneys who had done their homework.      The campaign continues.  Reporters today cover memory issues (typically portrayed as false) with the ease of political pundits discussing a favorite candidate, while psychology textbooks tell students that memories of childhood molestation, perhaps theirs or those of their friends of family members, are likely false.(1)

(1)Brand, B and McEwen, L. (2014, Fall). Coverage of Child Maltreatment and Its Effects in Three Introductory Psychology Textbooks. Trauma Psychology, p. 8. Online at http://tinyurl.com/hfc65cq

San Juan Ballroom

Sunday, 10:45-11:45 p.m.

“Backstage at the false memory campaign (Update – Questions and Discussions)


JULIE VALENTI

JULIE VALENTI

Owner and Program Director, Wisdom and Recovery Wellness Center

Julie Valenti, formerly a medical/surgical nurse, is the owner of the Wisdom and Recovery Healing Center located in Portland, Oregon. Her program provides individuals, couples, and families with support and guidance. Educational classes on addiction, trauma, brain re-wiring, as well as workshops and support groups for individuals and couples enrich the program. Mobile and Online access allows Julie to provide her clients with support and guidance across the U.S. and internationally. Julie has developed a unique approach to treat individuals struggling with PTSD due to childhood trauma. This method, named the ”The 20 Concepts”, has yielded such positive results that her clients have encouraged her to write a book to make these concepts more available to the public. Knowing How-20 Concepts to Rewire the Brain, will be in print and available for purchase later this year. She is currently a featured speaker at the Serenity Lane Drug and Alcohol Treatment Centers, located in Oregon and Washington. Her education and experience in treating addictions, as well as her own recovery from childhood trauma, brings an informative and interesting perspective to her presentations. Julie is also a Certified Hypnotherapist skilled in helping people overcome adversities and compulsive behaviors, which can be rooted in the subconscious mind. These powerful treatments are also proven to have positive results in the lessening of pain and anxiety. As an Ordained Minister, Julie brings a spiritual and mindful experience to a ceremony, whether it is an end of life ritual or a joy filled marital union.
Julie currently resides and works in Portland, Oregon and San Diego, California. Wisdom and Recovery Wellness Center

Presentations:

Orcas Room

Friday, 1:00-5:15 p.m.

“Knowing How – 20 Concepts to Re-wire your Brain” 3 CEU’s

Description:  In this class  we learn how a child’s brain and body develops (wires) when in an environment of stress and confusion. We often think about war when we hear the acronym  PTSD and many people don’t realize that when a secure, loving attachment is unavailable to a child, it is processed in the brain as a threat to survival. As an adult with PTSD, there will be specific triggers that cause a person to slip into a regressive (childlike) state. This disables the person from living a mature, peaceful and consistent life. I will teach 20 Concepts that when used repeatedly will re-wire the brain and diminish the disabling mood states and behaviors of PTSD. Current neuroscience states we can rewire the brain and the 20 Concepts are the tools to accomplish this.

1) Gain a basic understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the brain and body

2) Learn how neurological and hormonal systems (feelings) interplay 

3) Understand PTSD as it relates to trauma and childhood attachment conflicts 

4) Identify triggers and learn effective anchors, thereby reducing the flooding of emotions and regressive behaviors

5) Learn how to implement an intelligent and mature (5-part) communication formula to use when conflicts arise

6) Develop the skill of having an integrated viewpoint of situations and parts of oneself

7) Through repeated practice of the tools in the 20 Concepts, gain the ability to re-wire the brain—allowing one to live a mature, peaceful and joy filled life

 

FIONA BARNETT

FIONA BARNETTFiona Barnett is Australia’s most vocal and recognized whistleblower against VIP pedophilia. A survivor with an academic background, she offers professionals a unique insight into the victim’s mind. Fiona has studied forensic psychology, art therapy, academic giftedness and more recently, law. Fiona testified to the current Australian Child Abuse Royal Commission regarding her experiences of child trafficking, ritual abuse and military mind control. She fronted the nation’s media before launching into full-time advocacy and media liaison for victims. Fiona has a unique ability to describe the trauma-based procedures that CIA psychologists John Gittinger and Dr Antony Kidman employed to cause her dissociation, plus a rare understanding of the role intelligence plays in the victim selection and programming process. Her testimony concerning how she beat their programming offers hope for victims and their supporters.

Workshops:

Lopez Room

Friday, 9:15 – 11:45 a.m.

“Integration: I Did It My Way” (2 CEU’s)

Description:  There are many approaches and models available to clinicians who work with clients who have Dissociative Identity Disorder, have experienced Satanic Ritual Abuse, and government mind-control.   Using unique approaches, Fiona is now fully integrated and deprogrammed.  During this workshop, Fiona presents how she worked for decades with the goal to deprogram and integrate all of her parts.  She will share successful and unsuccessful techniques she tried in her passage towards integration and deprogramming while in a mental health system that did not provide services for victims such as herself.

Objectives:

1. Recognize the symptoms of deliberately induced dissociation,
2. Understand the forced dissociation process.
3. Facilitate integration – the do’s and don’ts.

Saturday, 10:30 – 11:45 a.m.

“Discussions with Fiona” (1 CEU)

Description:  An overview of Fiona’s experiences – followed by open discussion.  Fiona testified to the current Australian Child Abuse Royal Commission regarding her experiences of child trafficking, ritual abuse and military mind control. She fronted the nation’s media before launching into full-time advocacy and media liaison for victims. Fiona has a unique ability to describe the trauma-based procedures that CIA psychologists John Gittinger and Dr Antony Kidman employed to cause her dissociation, plus a rare understanding of the role intelligence plays in the victim selection and programming process. Her testimony concerning how she beat their programming offers hope for victims and their supporters. Attendees will have a chance to ask questions of Fiona as well as to get to know her in an informal environment.  

 

SUE NEUFELD-ELLIS, LMHC, CSAT, RN

Sue Neufeld-Ellis

Sue Neufeld-Ellis

Sue has worked in the fields of counseling, nursing, addictions and psychotherapy since 1981.She has been a meditation teacher for 20 years facilitating people in groups, individually, and couples. She has taught meditation at workshops and conferences nationally and internationally.Sue’s meditation CD ‘Serenity Through Meditation’ was done with musician Steven Halpern. Sue is also a co-author in the book ‘Clergy Sexual Misconduct’.She was part time faculty for six years at Bellevue Community College in WA where taught classes on Sex and Relationship Addiction, Partners and Stress Management. She is currently adjunct faculty for IITAP (International Institute for Trauma and Addiction Professionals) teaching Mindfulness to therapists. She has been trained in Mindfulness at the Univ. of Washington and is a trained meditation teacher through UCSD.  She has been a featured guest on several radio talk shows and was a columnist for a local newspaper on sex and relationship issues. She has a private practice in Bellevue, WA.  Quantum Healing


Presentations:

Lopez Room

Saturday 1:00 p.m. -3:00 p.m.

Title:  Grounding and Mindfulness

Description:

 Grounding is learning and using skillful techniques to assist you in being aware of your body and surroundings by being in the present. We will explore many useful techniques as well as some Mindfulness practices together.

1) Participants will be able to identify and practice emotional and physical grounding techniques.

2) Participants will experience at least three Mindfulness practices.

3) Participants will be able to identify and experience the Inquiry Process to better stay in the present.

Sunday 1:00 p.m.- 3:00 p.m.    

Title:  Mindfulness in Recovery

Description:

Come and experience Mindfulness practices to assist professionals, clients and others to assist with dealing with stress and uncomfortable emotions, as well as to become more calm and peaceful. We will talk, together, about what Mindfulness and Inquiry is and isn’t. I will share some of the history and research and ways I have used it for the last twenty five years.. We will also practice together.

1) Participants will be able explain some of the history and research of Mindfulness practices.

2) Participants will experience at least three Mindfulness practices and the Inquiry Process.

3) Participants will be able to explain the difference between formal and informal Mindfulness practices.

JERRY CRIMMINS

Jerry Crimmins

Jerry Crimmins is a writer and retired reporter and editor.

Jerry Crimmins is a writer and retired reporter and editor in the Chicago news business where he worked for 40 years for the Chicago Tribune, the Associated Press, the City News Bureau of Chicago, and The Chicago Daily Law Bulletin. He is 71 years old and has dealt with dissociative identity disorder acutely for 26 years. Looked at another way, starting with the origins of DID for Jerry in his childhood, he has dealt with it for most of his life. In the news business, Jerry broke an exclusive story that led to the largest grand jury investigation of vote fraud in Chicago history and more than 60 convictions. He also wrote a series of stories that was instrumental in freeing five American citizens from prison in Yugoslavia in five separate cases over six years. In cooperation with an Illinois state senator and the National Alliance on Mental Illness, Jerry and other Chicago Tribune reporters published a series of stories about irregularities at a suburban Chicago mental health center. These efforts led to the firing of the head of that center and the resignation of its board of directors. The mental health center was taken over by a local Catholic hospital. As a newsman, he has won many awards including a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Chicago Headline Club. As a writer on the side, Jerry is the author of two novels, “Fort Dearborn,” published by Northwestern University Press in 2006, and “Obits and Murders,” self-published by Ozanam Press in 1992. He is now working on a sequel to “Fort Dearborn.” Jerry is married to Dottie O’Hara Crimmins. They celebrate their 50th anniversary in April 2016. Jerry and Dottie, who live in Chicago, have three children and six grandchildren.

Workshops:

Lopez Room

Friday, 1:00-3:00 p.m. and Saturday – 3:15-4:15 p.m.  

“Techniques for Conversations With the Voices Within” 2 CEU

Description: This presentation introduces to doctors, students of the mind, and persons with DID to the techniques of ‘Conversations With The Voices Within’ — conversations which are written and saved. Jerry Crimmins will give examples from his own life of how repeated trauma in childhood caused Dissociated States, what those Dissociated States are like, as well as their characteristics and behavior. He will also tell how, with a doctor’s help, and through ‘Conversations With the Voices Within’, he healed and reintegrated himself and his Dissociated States.

Objectives:

Attendees will be able to:

1. Describe how childhood trauma affects people.
2. Explain, describe, and define different types of trauma and how it affects children.
3. Identify and describe the relationship between childhood-trauma and Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID).
4. Describe how/if the affects of trauma differ between cultures.


STACI SPROUT, LICSW, CSAT

STACI SPROUT, LICSW, CSAT

Staci Sprout, LICSW, CSAT is a licensed psychotherapist, author and publisher

Staci Sprout, LICSW, CSAT is a licensed psychotherapist, author and publisher with twenty years of experience as a therapist and social worker in a variety of settings from community mental health and hospitals to private clinical practice. She is also a survivor of extreme abuse and a human rights advocate. In 2009 she helped found the survivor-led North American Truth and Reconciliation Coalition (NATRC), and has presented for the SMART Conference and Survivorship in her area of personal and professional focus: sexual healing for survivors. In 2015 Staci published her first book, titled Naked in Pubic: A Memoir of Recovery From Sex Addiction and Other Temporary Insanities. Her ability to integrate her clinical experience with the story of her own recovery from trauma and multiple addictions offers an informed, accessible message of hope for anyone interested in transforming our extreme abuse culture. www.stacisprout.com. See her book reading here: https://vimeo.com/user47028359.

Presentations:

Shaw Room

Extreme Abuse and Addiction: Touchstones for Transformation

 Friday, 10:45 am – 11:45 am 

Part I:  “Extreme Abuse 101: An Overview” 1 CEU

This hour will include a definition of Extreme Abuse (EA) with examples divided into three categories: Pedophile-Porn Rings (PPR’s), Occult-Themed Abuse (commonly called “Ritual” or “Ritualized” Abuse), and Deliberate Trauma or Technical-Based Dissociation (DT-TBD), sometimes referred to as “Mind Control.” Practitioners will be given a tool for self-care when working with these extraordinary, yet often intense, clients.

  1. Define the four characteristics of Extreme Abuse (EA).
  2. Name three categories of Extreme Abuse (EA).
  3. Identify five strategies for practitioner self-care when working with EA survivors. 

 1:00  pm – 3:00 pm

 Part II: “Extreme Abuse and Addiction: Connections and Transformation” 2 CEU’s

Research has shown that the more abuse someone has suffered, the more likely they will be coping with overlapping addictive patterns. Part Two will explore how to assess EA survivors for the presence of addictions, particularly the harder-to-see problems with finances, time management, relationships, and sexuality. Both “acting out” and “acting in” or deprivation/avoidance patterns will be explored. Participants will be given a tool to help survivors self-define “sobriety” and help practitioners offer support and accountability.The second hour will include a panel presentation of EA survivors in 12-step addiction recovery who will discuss how they first recognized their addictions, how their trauma related to their compulsive patterns, and what has worked to guide them on a path to healthier choices. They will share how therapy and 12-step addiction recovery can work together to strengthen the healing process.

Objectives: Participants will be able to:

  1. Understand the difference between a single addiction and an addictive life process.
  2. Use a tool to help clients self-define what “sobriety” means to them and work toward their life visions.
  3. Understand how therapy and addiction recovery can be complimentary to helping survivors heal.


 

LANI KENT, Therapeutic Arts Facilitator

LANI KENT, Therapeutic Arts Facilitator Lani Kent is a Therapeutic Arts Facilitator; Speaker; Writer, and Artist /Owner of “Healing Expressions”. She has a compassionate heart for survivors of traumatic life experiences. For over ten years has offered adjunct expressive arts services, client support, consultation to therapeutic professionals, recovery groups, and clients, through “Restorative Creativity” individual and group workshops. Lani has in depth knowledge of the dissociative process as expressed through art, presents at conferences on these topics, and offers “Healing Expressions” vendor exhibits. She is passionate about sharing an authentic expression of the recovery journey in the hopes that others will find the courage to share their own stories and find a voice for the wounded places within.
Website: Healing Expressions By Lani Website

Presentations:

Lopez Room

Sunday,  10:45 – 11:45 a.m. 1  CEU

“Healing in Supportive Community: Creative Approaches to Encourage Healthy Identity in DID Recovery”

Description: Establishing and maintaining healthy support systems during recovery can be challenging for survivors. Although support from those also healing from dissociative disorders can be helpful and give survivors a sense of not being alone, this presentation explores unique and creative approaches to expanding the net work of support outside the “DID community”.  Through the development of “Care Teams” and other resources we will look at ways to encourage growth and increase long term “cohesive and balanced” identity that assists survivors ultimately in engaging and integrating back into the larger world (work, family, recreation, relationships, and spirituality).  These forms of support can help survivors manage seasons of crisis, assist with stabilization, safety and provide a healthy structure that moves survivors towards the goal of health. Whether “cooperative community” or “integration” is a survivor’s personal goal we will also explore cautions of creating too narrow of a support system. Using her own healing journey, artwork and work with clients, Lani will share this unique perspective on what does it mean to heal, become whole and “end the journey well”.

Saturday, 10:45-11:45 a.m., Orcas Room

Sunday, 3:15-4:15 p.m., Lopez Room

“Creative Self Care-Open Collage Studio”

Description: This is an amazing workshop where Lani guides attendees through interactive self-care while everyone has a chance to create their own collage.


MARY KNIGHT, MSW - Writer,Filmmaker

MARY KNIGHT,Writer,FilmmakerMary Knight obtained her Masters Degree in Social Work in 1980. She placed 100 children in adoptive homes and conducted 400 forensic evaluations in divorce cases in which custody or parenting time was disputed. Knight served as an expert witness in court over 100 times. She is now a full time filmmaker. Her short film about her first marriage is used by domestic violence organizations world wide. Her current project is a documentary about her recovered memories of extreme childhood abuse, including child pornography, torture, and family controlled human trafficking. Knight is happily married. She and her husband, Jerry, have five grandchildren, all of whom are above average in every way.

Presentations:

Orcas Room

Friday, 9:15-10:30 a.m.   “’Church’” Controlled Human Trafficking: What It Is & How To Stop It” 1 CEU

Description: When perpetrators of family controlled human trafficking are in church leadership roles, they use their power to hide the crimes they commit against children. The presenter’s father and grandfather were elders of their conservative church. Knight was abused by them, by male ministers, and by a female Sunday School teacher. As a trained and experienced forensic evaluator, Knight has developed specific ideas that can help detect and stop the type of abuse she endured as a child. She will share the knowledge she gained from her unsuccessful attempts to report concerns about a minister to three different denominations. Participants will be given the knowledge they need to make their church and their community a safer place for children.

Objectives:MARY KNIGHT, MSW

Saturday, 4:15-5:15      “How I Know My Childhood Memories are ‘True'” 1 CEU

Delayed recall is common when perpetrators are family members. The presenter is a survivor of family controlled human trafficking, a retired social worker, and a filmmaker. Her memories of abuse, which surfaced when she was 37, were confirmed by four relatives with similar memories. In a quest to come to terms with her childhood, Knight interviewed professionals known as the nation’s top memory experts. Video clips of these interviews will be used to explain the phenomena of recovered memories. With an increased appreciation of delayed recall, participants will be better able to relate to survivors who did not always remember their abuse.

Objectives:

  1. Identify three ways delayed recall might be helpful to a survivor.
  2. Identify two ways research has been misused to indicate recovered memories are often/usually false.
  3. Participants will be able to describe the predominate views of three professionals who are considered top memory experts.

San Juan Ballroom

Saturday, 7:00 until ….

Showing of  movie written and directed by Mary Knight – www.SisterMarysAngel.com

KIM LINCOLN

Kim Lincoln

Kim Lincoln

KIM LINCOLN is a somatic practitioner. Her blended skill set includes Touch Trauma Resolution of Injury-somatic touch skills for self regulation and resilience, Cranial Sacral therapy, and is a long standing member of Ortho-Bionomy International. She is the founder of Terrain of Essence, a school of embodied spiritual-psychology since 2007, serving as an integrative system to re-connect with the Self as whole. A survivor of trauma her passion is to assist others to feel safe in their body, trust their mind, and know their soul. Her book ‘Holy Here Wholly You, Embodying Heaven On Earth’ will be released at the end of this year. To celebrate the whole child she created and produced the children’s CD “A Garden of Songs, For the Magical Child.” Gently nurturing it brings us in touch with our genuine preciousness. http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/cheridale 

To learn more about Kim’s workshops and her upcoming book visit www.kimlincoln.com


Presentation:

Lopez Room

Friday, 3:15-4:15 p.m.   “’Re-Source: Embodying a felt sense of Wholeness” 1 CEU

Be more do less! Tap into a felt sense of wellness. Kim will teach an integrative somatic exercise that you can draw upon anytime you are feeling out of balance. Having suffered a series of complex traumas her earlier life she was unable to sit still without feeling anxious or freezing until developing this way of resourcing for herself long ago. Gaining such positive results she has now taught it to hundreds of students who have also experienced the beneficial effects of regulating the anxiety of overwhelm be it a runaway charge, shut down, fear of feeling, or intensity of feeling. Practicing this foundational exercise helped her to grow the capacity to be more present both mentally and physically connecting little by little with her fuller self. In turn there grew an ability to stay in her body and be more present with others as well.  Kim will speak to both the pitfalls and the benefits of being present and ways to navigate that terrain.

Objectives:

~ Learn to discern the confusion about ‘nothing’, numbness and being spaced out.

~ Learn a simple method to self-regulate and feel whole.

~ Have a felt experience of being here now.

 

NAOMI LOMBARDI, MA Clinical Psychology

Presentations:

NAOMI LOMBARDI

NAOMI LOMBARDI

Shaw Room

Friday, 3:15-4:15 p.m.

“Embodying & Honoring Our Sacred Body:  Being present with what is.

Description:

  • Building our Capacity for Embodiment & Self Regulation:  meditation, breathing, dancing, stretching, feldenkrais -awareness through slow movement to embody our wisdom mandala – our precious body.
  • Connect deeply with the body, mind & creativity.  How does one feel safe & grounded?  Learn a short guided meditation you can do anywhere.  Connect with the depth of your being in different meditation techniques. Calming the mind. Somatic experiencing.
  • Gathering skillful means to connect with:  self awareness, self knowledge, self experience
  • How can we know ourself if our core has been “split” off?  
  • What is our core? Toward a new definition of our “core.” Simple Techniques to connect with our core: short meditation, writing & inquiry.
  • How does the mind work?  What moves the mind in a positive or negative direction? Working with afflicted emotions and the inner impulse toward wholeness.  How to be present with afflicted emotions as a gateway to an inner dimension of stillness.
  • How does one learn to tolerate the charge as a discharge? stop the story, lose the mind and come to our senses.  
  • Access imagination, creativity:  how to access our creative essence to heal ourselves.

 

KATE WHITE

KATE WHITE

Kate White is a Recording Artist, Speaker, Worship Leader, Songwriter and Violinist. Kate tours regionally with her band and nationally as a solo artist and speaker. She is the Founder of Music That Matters, an organization dedicated to bringing hope to the hurting. As a trauma survivor Kate began songwriting as a way to help process her own healing journey. 15 years later, Kate’s 6th album and recent release, Six Feet Down, has synthesized her deeper understanding of trauma and dissociation with lyrics and music that help give a voice to the voiceless, and strength for the journey.  Music that Matters Website

Presentation/Performance:

Shaw Room

Friday, 4:15-5:15 p.m.

“Practical Tools For The Healing Journey – Developing Self-Care, Nurture, Compassion and Cooperation” 1 CEU

Description:  The healing journey through recovery can be traumatic in it’s own right as survivors walk through the process of recovering memories of abuse and trauma.  The added diagnosis of DID can feel overwhelming, isolating and even shameful as survivors wonder how they will cope with the pain and grief of their history and still manage present-day life, work, family, outside relationships and the myriad of triggers that they encounter.  Through her own story, Kate will share practical tools that have helped her to navigate this healing journey, both in managing the trauma memories that come up and how to live and move toward integration and /or cooperation including ways to grow in greater self awareness, developing a nurturing and compassionate heart toward our inner world and differentiating between trying to “control” and suppress what’s going on inside versus creating an environment of safety, community and cooperation.

Orcas Room – Saturday, 4:15-5:15 p.m.

“Practical Tools For The Healing Journey – Developing Self-Care, Nurture, Compassion and Cooperation” 1 CEU

Description:  The healing journey through recovery can be traumatic in it’s own right as survivors walk through the process of recovering memories of abuse and trauma.  The added diagnosis of DID can feel overwhelming, isolating and even shameful as survivors wonder how they will cope with the pain and grief of their history and still manage present-day life, work, family, outside relationships and the myriad of triggers that they encounter.  Through her own story, Kate will share practical tools that have helped her to navigate this healing journey, both in managing the trauma memories that come up and how to live and move toward integration and /or cooperation including ways to grow in greater self awareness, developing a nurturing and compassionate heart toward our inner world and differentiating between trying to “control” and suppress what’s going on inside versus creating an environment of safety, community and cooperation.

San Juan Ballroom

Saturday, 7:00- … p.m.

Performing Live Entertainment –

JOSHUA MOORE, MAC, LMHCA, BCN

Joshua Moore, MAC, LMHCA, BCN

Joshua Moore, MAC, LMHCA, BCN

Joshua Moore has a Master of Arts in Counseling (MAC) from Multnomah University, is a Licensed Mental Health Counselor Associate (LMHCA) and is Board Certified in Neurofeedback (BCN).  Joshua is the owner of Alternative Behavioral Therapy and has been practicing Neurofeedback with dissociation in conjunction with local therapists since 2013.  Joshua currently uses a variety of therapies, such as Infra-low Neurofeedback, Alpha-theta, SRM Training, EMDR, CES, BAUD, Play Therapy, Internal Family Systems, and Psycho-dynamic Therapy.

Presentation:

Shaw Room

Friday, 9:15-10:30 a.m.

“An introduction to Neurofeedback and Applications for Dissociation” 1 CEU

Description:  You will learn a brief history and theory of Neurofeedback.  Joshua will review the applications of Neurofeedback for dissociation and related topics, such as PTSD, addictions, and attachment.  Joshua will discuss the challenges facing Neurofeedback and upcoming developments for it’s future use.

Objectives: 

  1. Gain a basic understanding of Neurofeedback
  2. Review research and applications for dissociation
  3. Prerequisites for dissociative clients to use Neurofeedback

 

KAHNEMA RODMAN

Kahnema Rodman

Kahnema Rodman

Kahnema Rodman is a Peer Support Specialist in the state of Oregon. She has been involved in a local Clubhouse for some time. She respects and admires the clubhouse model and the standards by which Clubhouse are ran. The clubhouse model gives the opportunity for all of those involved to have a voice and to explore their values.

Presentation:

San Juan Ballroom

Sunday, 3:30-4:30 p.m.

“A Celebration of International Clubhouses”

“Clubhouse International is multi-national non-profit organization that helps communities around the world create sustainable solutions for mental illness by developing and nurturing new and existing Clubhouses.  Now over 300 worldwide, Clubhouses are community-based centers that offer members opportunities for friendship, employment, housing, education, and access to medical and psychiatric services through a single caring and safe environment, so members can achieve a sense of belonging and become productive members of society.” (http://www.iccd.org/about.html)    Kahnema’s presentation will be a celebration of Clubhouses – including the Medford, Oregon Compass House, which she is a member of the board of directors.  This will be a fun presentation where clubhouses will celebrate successes and share their experiences.

EMILY JAEGER, iRest® Meditation Lvl 2, RYT

Emily Jaeger, iRest® Meditation Lvl 2, RYT

Emily Jaeger received the iRest® Meditation Level 2 training through Anne Douglas, iRest Senior Teacher Trainer and Director of Training; with Level 1 completion through iRest founder Richard Miller, PhD, in 2015. Also, she is a Certified Yoga Teacher (2014).Currently, she is working toward iRest certification (lvl 3) under the supervision of Robin Carnes, iRest Senior Teacher and Warriors At Ease co-founder. Her focus areas for iRest application are on stress relief (from day-to-day to PTSD) and sleep enhancement.Emily offers 4 or 8 week classes, workshops and private sessions –using a hybrid of guided meditation and yoga poses- that allow participants to try on ‘what is good and whole about themselves’ which builds inner-capacity. With more capacity, individuals can more thoroughly engage with their medical or mental health processes for sustainable healing. Additionally, this practice proves useful to ‘press reset’ from day-to-day living stressors. Emily’s guidance is described as: Alignment-Oriented, Gentle Strength for Customized Courage & Empowerment.The application of iRest is a restorative journey and has helped many through spectrum of stress and trauma (www.irest.us). For Emily, it served as the missing sail to fully embark on inner-healing and its many tributaries. Like many others, she tried on a variety of traditional and non-traditional healing methods where she plateaued or found little relief, repeatedly. One of her Healing Guides presented iRest as option to investigate. Within the practice and training she re-discovered her perfect life partners: discerning wisdom and compassionate love. “I’m grateful and humbled how this practice uncovered and grew all of me. I am honored to be part of the restorative journey and now: paying it forward as a guide.”  For more information about services offered by Emily, visit: https://www.facebook.com/AccessMeditation/

 

Presentation:

Orcas Room

Saturday, 1:00-3:00 p.m.

“iRest® – Guided Meditation for Wholeness”  2 CEU

Empowering life skills to grow Inner-Safety, release Self-Judgement and restore Inner-Harmony with an evidence-based, non-dual, participant-validated 10-step process.

BOYYM

BoyyM

BoyyM

My name is Donavan, many know me also as BoyyM. I currently run North West Washington Service dog group, a group dedicated to legal service dog training, education and legal information. While I work with and train Service Dogs for many disabilities, I particularly enjoy training Psychiatric Service dogs. I will be speaking about the types of Service dogs, the process of owner training a Psychiatric Service dog, the legal aspects of doing so and the costs. I’ll answer questions at the end of the time as well as throughout the conference.

Note: Some speakers are not listed here, but will be listed on the program at the conference for their privacy. We reserve the right to update the speakers and/or schedule at our discretion. Please stay updated here or at our other sites.

Quick Schedule


Activities Thursday, October 6, 2016

2:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.
* Those who arrive earlier than 2:00 p.m., make yourself comfortable.
* Pre-conference Check-in – pick up your program, landyard, name tag, and grab-bag early.
* Exhibit table set-up
* Meet and Greet for Everyone – directions to Hospitality Room will be posted in the Foyer.
* Registration
You are all welcome to help, if you would like to.

Conference Schedule Friday – October 7, 2016

7:00-7:45 a.m. – Swimming Pool – preliminary location or room will be announced – Emily JaegerHatha Yoga Basics is appropriate for all experience levels (including zero experience). This class is alignment-focused with a mixture of seated, standing and laying down postures to gently enhance strength and improve balance. It is sure to stimulate the brain’s absorption capability throughout the day.

8:00-5:00 a.m. – Registration


8:45-9:15 a.m. – Welcome, Announcements, and Introductions


9:15-10:30 a.m.
*San Juan Ballroom:Dana C. Ross, M.D., MSC, FRCPC, “Unpacking the Concept of Trauma-informed Care”
(1 CEU)
*Lopez Room: Fionna Barnett, “Integration: I Did It My Way”, (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room: Mary Knight “’Church’” Controlled Human Trafficking: What It Is & How To Stop It” (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room:Joshua Moore, MAC, LMHCA, BCN, “An Introduction to Neurofeedback and Applications for Dissociation”
(1 CEU)


10:30 -10:45 a.m. – Break


10:45-11:45 a.m.

*San Juan Ballroom: A.Steven Frankel, Ph.D .,J.D, “What would have happened if Dr. Jekyll were tried for Mr. Hyde’s crimes? D.I.D. and the law.”, (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room:Fionna Barnett, “Integration: I Did It My Way”, (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room:Lynn Crook, M.Ed., “Backstage at the false memory campaign”, (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room:Staci Sprout, LICSW, CSAT, “Extreme Abuse and Addiction: Touchstones for Transformation” Part I: “Extreme Abuse 101: An Overview”, (1 CEU)


11:45-1:00 p.m. – Lunch


1:00-3:00 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: A.Steven Frankel, Ph.D .,J.D, Joan Golston DCSW, LICSW, “Client & Therapist, Working to Work Together – Is it Oil & Water or Milk & Honey?”, (2 CEU’s)
*Lopez Room: Jerry Crimmins, “Techniques for Conversations With the Voices Within”,(2 CEU’s)
*Orcas Room: JULIE VALENTI, “Knowing How- 20 Concepts to Re-wire your Brain”, (2 CEU’s)
*Shaw Room:Staci Sprout, LICSW, CSAT, “Extreme Abuse and Addiction: Touchstones for Transformation”, Part II: Connections and Transformation”, (2 CEU’s


3:00-3:15 p.m. – Break


3:15-4:15 p.m.-
*San Juan Ballroom: Dana C. Ross, M.D., MSC, FRCPC, “An Introduction to the Neurobiology of Developmental Trauma”, (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room:LAURA S. BROWN, PH.D., “Not the price of admission: Healthy relationships after childhood trauma.” ,(1 CEU)
*Orcas Room: JULIE VALENTI, “Knowing How- 20 Concepts to Re-wire your Brain” (part 2), (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room:Naomi Lombardi, “Embodying & Honoring Our Sacred Body: Being present with what is.” (1 CEU)


4:15-5:15 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom:Dana C. Ross, M.D., MSC, FRCPC, “An Introduction to the Neurobiology of Developmental Trauma” part 2, (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room:Joan C. Golston, DCSW, LICSW, “Lessons from the Testimony of a Concentration Camp Survivor — a powerful primer on the effect devastating abuse has on the dissociative child or adult emerging from other contexts of suffering and neglect” (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room: JULIE VALENTI
“Knowing How- 20 Concepts to Re-wire your Brain” (part 3), (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Kate White-Recording Artist, Speaker, Worship Leader, Songwriter, and Violinist
“Practical Tools For The Healing Journey – Developing Self-Care, Nurture, Compassion and Cooperation”
(1 CEU)


5:15 p.m. – Dinner


7:00 p.m. –
*San Juan Ballroom: Entertainment – Mary Knight, MSW “Movie Night – Seattle Premiere of “Sister Mary’s Angel” (PG-13) – Cash Bar.

Conference Schedule Saturday – October 8, 2016

7:00-7:45 a.m. – Swimming Pool – preliminary location or room will be announced – Emily JaegerHatha Yoga Basics is appropriate for all experience levels (including zero experience). This class is alignment-focused with a mixture of seated, standing and laying down postures to gently enhance strength and improve balance. It is sure to stimulate the brain’s absorption capability throughout the day.

8:00-5:00 a.m. – Check-in and Registration


9:00-9:15 a.m. – Opening Statements


9:15-10:30 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Plenary – Colin Ross, M.D. “A Dissociative Structural Model of Mental Disorders and Addictions”, (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


10:30 -10:45 a.m. – Break


10:45-11:45 a.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Colin Ross, M.D., “How Common is DID and Can It Be Reliably Diagnosed?”, (1CEU)
*Lopez Room:Fionna Barnett, “Discussions with Fiona”, (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room:Lani Kent is a Therapeutic Arts Facilitator, “Creative Self Care-Open Collage Studio”,
(1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


11:45-1:00 p.m.- Lunch


1:00-3:00 p.m.

*San Juan Ballroom: Colin Ross, M.D., “Trauma Model Therapy: The Problem of Attachment to the Perpetrator and the Locus of Control Shift” (2 CEU’s)
*Lopez Room: SUE NEUFELD-ELLIS, LMHC, CSAT, RN, ” Grounding and Mindfulness”, (2 CEU’s)
*Orcas Room: Emily Jaeger, iRest® Meditation Lvl 2, RYT, “iRest® – Guided Meditation for Wholeness”
(2 CEU’s)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


3:00-3:15 p.m. – Break


3:15-4:15 p.m.

*San Juan Ballroom: Colin Ross, M.D. & Dana C. Ross M.D., MSC, FRCPC, Colin Ross, M.D. & Dana C. Ross M.D., MSC, FRCPC, “Open Discussion, Questions and Answers”, (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room: Kim Lincoln, “Re-Source: Embodying a felt sense of Wholeness”, (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room: BoyyM / Donavon, “Service Dog Education and Information”
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


4:15-5:15 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Colin Ross, M.D. & Dana C. Ross M.D., MSC, FRCPC, “Open Discussion, Questions and Answers”(cont.), (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room: Mary Knight, “How I Know My Childhood Memories are ‘True'”, (1 CEU)
*Orcas Room: Kate White-Recording Artist, Speaker, Worship Leader, Songwriter, and Violinist, “Practical Tools For The Healing Journey – Developing Self-Care, Nurture, Compassion and Cooperation”
(1 CEU)

*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


5:15-7:00 p.m. – Dinner


7:00- p.m. –
*San Juan Ballroom: Entertainment – Cash bar – Featuring: Kate White-Recording Artist, Speaker, Worship Leader, Songwriter, and Violinist.”

Conference Schedule Sunday,October 9, 2016

8:00-9:15 a.m. – Check-in and Registration


9:15-9:30 a.m. – Opening statements


9:30-10:30 a.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Plenary, A.Steven Frankel, Ph.D .,J.D, Joan Golston, DCSW, LICSW, “Understanding and appreciating D.I.D.: Up from the ghetto”, (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


10:30 -10:45 a.m. – Break


10:45-11:45 a.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Lynn Crook, M.Ed., “Backstage at the false memory campaign(Follow-up and Discussion”
(1 CEU)
*Lopez Room: Lani Kent is a Therapeutic Arts Facilitator, “Healing in Supportive Community: Creative Approaches to Encourage Healthy Identity in DID Recovery”, (1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


11:45-1:00 p.m. – Lunch


1:00-3:00 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: DAVID L. CALOF, DAPA
” “Exploring Motivation, Meaning and Intervention in Self-Injuring Behavior and Suicidal Ideation with David L. Calof”, (2 CEU)
*Lopez Room: SUE NEUFELD-ELLIS, LMHC, CSAT, RN, “Mindfulness in Recovery”, (2 CEU’s)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


3:00-3:15 p.m. – Break


3:15-4:15 p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Kahnema Rodman, Clubhouse International – “Medford Compass House” (1 CEU)
*Lopez Room: Lani Kent is a Therapeutic Arts Facilitator, “Creative Self Care-Open Collage Studio”
(1 CEU)
*Shaw Room: Open for hospitality, crafts and small workshops.


4:15- p.m.
*San Juan Ballroom: Ending statements and goodbye reception


Thank you for your patience.  If you have questions, please write to me.

Pat Goodwin, MA

felicity4us2@gmail.com